Nudes from Tumblr vol. 15

In an effort to evolve the site, I’ve decided to do things a little different this week with the Tumblr nudes.  But before that, a couple of items of interest.  I’ll be updating the directory tonight.  I haven’t for about a week because not many new models have come to light, especially from the big sites.  Tumblr collecting really jacks up the number of models available on the site, so I might be doing that once a week when I do the Tumblrs.  I’ll see.  Second, I have added a link to the sidebar to a Terry Richardson publication (I think), that I found this weekend called Richardson Mag.  Looks like a pretty cool site.  I saw some editorial style pictures of a topless Jenna Jameson, and some other interesting bits.  Just seems like the site doesn’t have much on it, not nearly as much as on this site.  Still, it’s a fun, on-topic site from a pretty trendy photographer, these days.

Photographer… which brings me to my point.  Since, sometimes, when a model is posted on a Tumblr, a photographer is credited, I will now include this credit in my post here if the picture is of sufficient merit.  I appreciate nude art more for the beauty of the models.  At the same time, I’ve neglected to men good photographers when their artistry is worth talking about, or at least creditable.  There are just so many photographers, professional and amateur, how can you give credit to someone guilty of clichéd photography and while seeking recognition for being an visionary?  What I mean is that there are some photographers who are more owners of expensive cameras with access to enviable artistic resources than they are true artists.

Of the pictures I came across, the notable photographers I credit for this post are David Bellemere, Michael Sloane, Michael Donovan, Mark Maggiori, Mariano Vivanco, Ludovic Sanchez, Walter Chin, Georgina Staikou, Tsikunov, Ruslan Lobanov, Mario Testino, Terry Richardson, Emilia Isaksson, Pim van Offeren,Tobias Lundkvist, Stephane Lepine, and Bertrand Photography.  I found an interesting behind the scenes picture of Kate Moss by Mario Sorrenti for the 2012 Pirelli calendar.

Also, I found a nude of the actress Carré Otis from the 1989 July issue of Vogue UK.  I only mention her because she was one the first women I really took time to appreciate nude when I was younger.  She was in this movie called Wild Orchid, with Mickey Rourke, whom she married eventually, apparently, and Playboy magazine did a spread about it due to the strong, sexual content.  If I remember correctly, all the sex scenes in the movie were laid out in what we call screen caps, today, sequential frames of the action.  I enjoyed them.  I found a clip of one of the sex scenes, recently (that I would have uploaded to the site to illustrate what I’m talking about, had I known I was going to come across this picture of Carré Otis.

Peta Todd topless Tumblr

There are so many great pictures in this update- over 300, this Peta Todd is a safe bet for the front page, just to say, you know what’s in here, no get your ass in here and check out the pictures.  Also, it looks like she’s looking up at what I wrote.

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Vincent Peters Nudes

Vincent Peter photography

Vincent Peters is a photographer who has shot for all the Vogue magazines. He likes Italian Vogue best. He’s also shot for lots of the  luxury brands, like Versace, Armani, Tortellini, L’Oreal, Fettucini Alfredo, Nike, and Bottega Veneta. Actually, I think a couple of those are foods, but you get the idea. Needless to say, for a guy who takes naked pictures for a living, he’s put together a brilliant resume.  Now, if he only did weddings…

He doesn’t necessarily snap pictures of naked women for a living.  Naturally, naked women fit into his making the decision to become a photography. He admits this.  I give him credit for being candid about his ambitions, too. Don’t sell a line about art and beauty, blah, blah, blah, because nobody is buying it. If you became a photographer, especially a fashion/glamour photographer because you want to look at women, meet women, etc., just say so.  Either you become a photographer of some kind or you go to Hollywood and try and become the next Inarritu or Malick. These are the professions which turn boring Friday nights into the Friday nights when what happens on Friday night stays on Friday night. No comment.

Vincent Peters was kicked out of school at some point. That had to piss of his beloved mother. Still, had to find work. He met a photographer, worked as an assistant, which he was no good at, and he figured he’d be better off having assistants.

Right now, Vincent is working in Hong Kong, one of the big fashion capitols.  He travels without an iPad.  The horror.  He’s one of those photographers I wrote about a few weeks ago who plays music during shoots. He says that he doesn’t hear it though, because he’s so focused on his work. Still, it’s safe to say, some models will open up more if you’re playing music. The photographer/model back-and-forth is like a dance, anyway. Give it a soundtrack. Should be easy with between 2-10 people working for you during a given shoot.

After 20 years in the business of photography, Vincent feels digital has had the most profound impact on the industry. Oh, and cigarettes cause cancer. Didn’t need him to tell us that. Digitization has changed the world. That’s like saying if you were to start a model agency you’d start it with Kate, Natalia, and Natasha. Of course you’d start and agency with Kate, Natalia, and Natasha, anybody would, him included.

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